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Tenses for Beginners: A Study of The Basics

Chapter 2: My Native Land: Class 8 English: Important Questions and Answers: Assam Board

Lesson 2

My Native Land

English Class VIII

Sunbeam English Reader - III


Important Questions and Answers:


1. Read the poem and answer the questions that follow:

(a) What does the old man ask the poet?

Ans: The old man asks the poet what his native land is like.

(b) Why does the old man ask the question to the poet?

Ans: The old man is blind. He cannot see for himself. So he asks the question.

(c) How does the poet address the old man? What does that form of address mean?

Ans: The poet addresses the old man as Koka meaning grandfather.

This word is used to address both grandfather and grandfatherly figures in Assamese.

(d) Why does the poet ask the old man to breathe deep?

Ans: The poet asks the old man to breathe deep for it will evoke memories of his childhood friends that characterise his native land.

(e) With what does the poet compare the cool breeze on the old man's face?

Ans: The poet compares the cool breeze on his face with the peaceful breath of his land.

(f) With what does the poet compare the contented gurgling of the little baby?

Ans: The poet compares the contented gurgling of the little boy with the soil of the old man's native land.

(g) What does the chorus of the cuckoo and the sparrows do?

Ans: The chorus of the cuckoo and the sparrows shape the old man's native land.

(h) What are the things that create the soul of the poet's beloved country?

Ans: The things that create the soul of the poet's beloved country include the sounds of the bihu dhol, the pepa, the gogona, the sweet smell of the pitha and the laroo and the chant of the evening prayer of different communities.



2. A brief summary of each of the stanzas of the poem has been given below. Match the stanzas with the given summaries. Mention the stanza number alongside the correct summary.

(a) My native land makes me feel as safe and secure as a baby carried on a mother's back.

Ans: Stanza 4

(b) The spirit of my native land can be understood in terms of its unity in diversity. Like different family members who have similarities and differences, yet belong to the same family and have the same home, in our native land, our family members practise different religions and traditions.

Ans: Stanza 6

(c) The lonely, blind man in the street asked me to describe our native land.

Ans: Stanza 1

(d) Our native land is rich in its gift of nature and is brought to life by the birds and animals that playfully roam its rich green forests.

Ans: Stanza 5

(e) The touch of our native land is as peaceful as the cool, fresh breeze blowing after a night of thunder and rain.

Ans: Stanza 3



3. Find out in the poem examples associated with touch, hearing and smell.

(i) Ans: Touch: The warm air, the cool breeze, rain.

(ii) Ans: Hearing: Thunder, rain, the chirping of cuckoos and sparrows, the beating of dhol, blowing of pepa and gogona, the  chanting of evening prayers of different communities.

(iii) Ans: Smell: The sweet smell of the pitha and laroo.



4. Match the words:

Ans:

Thunder --- the loud explosive sound that follows lightning in the clouds.

Morn --- morning

Contented --- satisfied

Gurgling --- the happy sound made by babies

Chorus --- strong and firm

Aroma --- strong pleasant smell

Sturdy --- strong and firm



10 Additional Important Short Questions and Answers:

1. What do you mean by Koka?

And: Grandfather

2. Who breathes deep?

Ans: The old man.

3. Where do the cuckoo and sparrows play?

Ans: Around the treetops.

4. Who gurgles?

Ans: The little baby.

5. What are the places of worship mentioned in the poem?

Ans: The namghar, masjid and church.

6. Name the foods that the poet mentions.

Ans: The pitha and laroo.

7. Where is the little baby tied to?

Ans: To the mother's sturdy back.

8. "Tell me what my land is like". -Who says this?

Ans: The blind old man.

9. Who plays the pepa and gogona?

Ans: Our neighbours.

10. What is the sound of the bihu dhol called in the poem?

Ans: The distant roll.

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